hollybailey:


It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.
Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.
Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.
“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”
So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.
He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.
It’s that career that is the subject of  “Testament,”  a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)

hollybailey:

It was one of the most searing images of the war in Iraq: a tiny girl, splattered in blood and screaming in horror after her parents had been shot and killed by American soldiers who fired on the family car when it failed to yield for a foot patrol in the northern town of Tel Afar.

Taken by Getty Images photographer Chris Hondros, who was embedded with the patrol, the January 2005 photo offered powerful visual testimony to the horrific impact of the conflict on Iraqi citizens. It came as the American public was beginning to question the rising death toll and purpose of a war that was starting to look unwinnable.

Hondros was inured to the chaos of war. By then, he was a veteran combat photographer who had served as a witness for the world on the frontlines of conflicts in far-away places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Liberia and Sierra Leone. But Hondros wasn’t merely fueled by the adrenaline of covering war. He was there to document the impact of conflict on people, both soldiers and civilians, to discover something deeper about humanity through war.

“He tried to make sense of what was happening around him, to really understand the chaos that he often found himself in,” recalled Sandy Ciric, a longtime photo editor at Getty Images who was one of Hondros’s closest friends and colleagues. “He was a professional, and he knew it was his job to document. But he was also human. He was really affected by the people he met and the things he saw… He was always thinking and writing and shooting and working, trying to understand the terrible complexity of war and the impact it had on people.”

So it was a horrible and painful twist of fate that a photographer so determined to show the world the human impact of conflict died trying to do just that. Hondros was killed in a mortar attack along with fellow photojournalist Tim Hetherington in April 2011 while covering the war in Libya.

He left behind an adoring mother, a fiance and a tight-knit group of friends and colleagues who were devastated by his death but also determined to preserve his memory and legacy as one of the most promising photojournalists of a generation who died too soon.

It’s that career that is the subject of “Testament,” a new book of Hondros’s work published by Powerhouse Books and Getty Images (which is donating its portion of the proceeds to The Chris Hondros Fund). The book, edited by Ciric and Pancho Bernasconi of Getty Images and Christina Piaia, Hondros’s fiance, features not only images that Hondros took over more than a decade of covering conflict, but also his own words, taken from stories and essays he wrote about his experiences on the road as he sought to understand what he was seeing through his lens.

I previewed the new Chris Hondros Book, which is out today (via Yahoo News)


tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Amber Zakala
Tumblr: http://amberzakalaphotography.tumblr.com/

tumblropenarts:

Artist Name: Amber Zakala

Tumblr: http://amberzakalaphotography.tumblr.com/


rogwalker:

Thursday, May 23, 2013 - Brooklyn

Textured Cities by Rog Walker

Photo Book available HERE



midnightmartinis:

decadence - by deadendsoul

midnightmartinis:

decadence - by deadendsoul


photojojo:

Besides cats, there’s nothing more commonly photographed than sunsets. In spite of that, Bing Wright manages to capture them in a truly unique way. 

In “Broken Mirror/Evening Sky,” Wright photographs the reflections of magnificent sunsets on shattered mirrors. 

Sunsets As Seen Through Shattered Mirrors

via Colossal


Environmental Engineering Helps People Cope up with Everyday Environmental Issues

environmental-engineering:

Engineering is a science to solve the problems of everyday, and so is the case with environmental engineering. As the environmental concerns are growing across the world, environmental engineers and environmental consultants are in great demand to resolve the environmental issues facing people…


designersofthings:

3D Printed Human Organ Coming in 2014
San Diego-based company Organovo is getting ready to unveil the world’s first 3D printed human liver next year. The organ will be used for research and drug discovery but the bioprinting company’s vision is to leverage this technology for surgical therapy and transplants. 
Bioprinting works in a similar fashion to the 3D printers which use plastic or metal. But instead of printing an iPhone case the end result is an organ. The bioprinter prints layers of material, in this case live tissue instead of ABS, which create a solid physical item. 
The biggest hurdle in printing tissues is developing the vascular system required to keep the tissue alive. Without a functioning system providing tissues with the  nutrients and oxygen they need to survive the printed tissue dies. Organovo says they have overcome these issues.
According to the ComputerWorld, Organovo has printed a liver that is greater than 500 microns thick, the equivalent of 5 stacked sheets paper. But more importantly, they have maintained the live tissue for at least 40 days.
Organovo’s breakthrough is that they have successfully printed living tissues that can be kept alive long enough for research or in the near future to implant in a human body to continue to develop.  
The ability to print organs is a game changer for the thousands of people who are on the organ waiting list. But don’t expect it to happen overnight. Once the technology is there, it will need to go through regulatory approvals to make it available. But Organovo’s milestone is a sure sign that we are headed in that direction.
This isn’t the first time we have seen 3D printers used to create human parts. Back in August reports emerged about researchers from Princeton and Johns Hopkins who had printed an ear using cartilage and electronic parts.
Source: ComputerWorld
Image Source: Organovo

designersofthings:

3D Printed Human Organ Coming in 2014

San Diego-based company Organovo is getting ready to unveil the world’s first 3D printed human liver next year. The organ will be used for research and drug discovery but the bioprinting company’s vision is to leverage this technology for surgical therapy and transplants. 

Bioprinting works in a similar fashion to the 3D printers which use plastic or metal. But instead of printing an iPhone case the end result is an organ. The bioprinter prints layers of material, in this case live tissue instead of ABS, which create a solid physical item. 

The biggest hurdle in printing tissues is developing the vascular system required to keep the tissue alive. Without a functioning system providing tissues with the  nutrients and oxygen they need to survive the printed tissue dies. Organovo says they have overcome these issues.

According to the ComputerWorld, Organovo has printed a liver that is greater than 500 microns thick, the equivalent of 5 stacked sheets paper. But more importantly, they have maintained the live tissue for at least 40 days.

Organovo’s breakthrough is that they have successfully printed living tissues that can be kept alive long enough for research or in the near future to implant in a human body to continue to develop.  

The ability to print organs is a game changer for the thousands of people who are on the organ waiting list. But don’t expect it to happen overnight. Once the technology is there, it will need to go through regulatory approvals to make it available. But Organovo’s milestone is a sure sign that we are headed in that direction.

This isn’t the first time we have seen 3D printers used to create human parts. Back in August reports emerged about researchers from Princeton and Johns Hopkins who had printed an ear using cartilage and electronic parts.

Source: ComputerWorld

Image Source: Organovo


kateoplis:

Dutch designer Daan Roosegaarde is trying to replace streetlights with glow-in-the-dark trees using “the bio-luminescent qualities of jellyfish and mushrooms.” The glowing plants are created by “splicing DNA from luminescent marine bacteria to the chloroplast genome of a common houseplant, so the stem and leaves emit a faint light similar to that produced by fireflies and jellyfish.”